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Understanding Computers

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Understanding Computers

Overall Expectations

By the end of this course, students will:

A1. describe the functions of different types of hardware components, and assess the hardware needs of users;
A2. describe the different types of software products, and assess the software needs of users;
A3. use the basic functions of an operating system correctly;
A4. demonstrate an understanding of home computer networking concepts;
A5. explain the importance of software updates and system maintenance to manage the performance and increase the security of a computer.
   

Specific Expectations

A1.

Hardware Components

  By the end of this course, students will:
 
A1.1 use correct terminology to describe computer hardware (e.g., USB, FSB, IEEE 1394 interface), speed measurements (e.g., megahertz), and size measurements (e.g., megabytes, gigabytes);
A1.2 describe the functions of the internal components of a computer (e.g., CPU, RAM, ROM, cache, hard drive, motherboard, power supply, video card, sound card);
A1.3 describe the functions of common computer peripheral devices (e.g., printer, monitor, scanner, keyboard, mouse, speakers, USB flash drive);
A1.4 assess user computing needs and select appropriate hardware components for different situations (e.g., a student on a fixed budget, a home business user, a gaming enthusiast, a photographer, a home video enthusiast, a distance education user, a human resources manager, an accountant).
   

A2.

Software Products

  By the end of this course, students will:
 
A2.1 explain the difference between software used for applications (e.g., word processor, spreadsheet, email client), programming (e.g., an integrated development environment), and systems (e.g., operating system tools such as a registry editor and a defragmenting tool);
A2.2 assess user computing needs and select appropriate software for different situations (e.g., a student on a fixed budget, a home business user, a gaming enthusiast, a photographer, a home video enthusiast, a distance education user, a human resources manager, an accountant).
   

A3.

Operating Systems

  By the end of this course, students will:
 
A3.1 describe operating system functions that meet various user needs (e.g., running applications, organizing files, managing users, configuring peripherals);
A3.2 use file management techniques to organize and manage files (e.g., copy, move, delete, rename files; create shortcut);
A3.3 use general keyboard shortcuts to perform common tasks (e.g., cut, copy, paste, print, print window, print screen);
A3.4 describe the features and limitations of various operating systems.
   

A4.

Home Computer Networking

  By the end of this course, students will:
 
A4.1 identify various networking applications and protocols (e.g., VoIP, streaming media, FTP, email, instant messaging);
A4.2 describe the features and functions of wired and wireless networking hardware (e.g., NICs, routers, hubs, cables, modems);
A4.3 demonstrate an understanding of various methods for sharing network resources (e.g., shared file access, shared printer access, Internet access).
   

A5.

Maintenance and Security

  By the end of this course, students will:
 
A5.1 describe different types of malware (e.g., viruses, Trojan horses, worms, spyware, adware, malevolent macros) and common signs of an intrusion, and explain how to prevent malware attacks;
A5.2 explain the importance of maintaining software updates (e.g., operating system updates, application software updates, virus definitions) to increase computer security and maintain hardware and software compatibility;
A5.3 explain the importance of preventive maintenance (e.g., defragmenting a hard drive, deleting unused software and data files) to manage computer performance.
   

 

Source: The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 10 to 12: Computer Studies, 2008 (revised), page 34-5 PDF Format

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